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It can be a challenging read, but then the end is worth the effort Late in Brendan, the author, in one of the rambling, associative story threads that make this novel, Brendan mentions the Thin Places in the warp and fabric of creation, where other spiritual realms intrude close by our reality The entire book, I found, lies along a seam ripped in one of these thin places.If a reader expects a straight line narrative, then this would not be a good choice, as it wanders in and around three and It can be a challenging read, but then the end is worth the effort Late in Brendan, the author, in one of the rambling, associative story threads that make this novel, Brendan mentions the Thin Places in the warp and fabric of creation, where other spiritual realms intrude close by our reality The entire book, I found, lies along a seam ripped in one of these thin places.If a reader expects a straight line narrative, then this would not be a good choice, as it wanders in and around three and sometimes four different narrative threads as well as modified quotes from the Saint s personal journals They intersect, they diverge, they run parallel The primary characters drift in and out of the scenes at hand with a striking resemblance to the out and back nature of Saint Brendan s voyages towards God, in all His forms Some are factual, some are emotional washes fraught with color, some are allegory All reveal the man who became a Saint, and the Saint who was a man.As an historic reference, this book captures the diaphonous nature of the cultures of the soon to be, Post Roman World, very well The author s affectionate descriptions of the nuance of the Irish language and her people remain singular in my reading experience The book embraces Irish Catholicism as fervently as it embraces the older faiths it replaced, and makes a well argued point for the hospitable nature of the Celtic Druids They left a great deal of their spirit in the resulting blend of spirituality unique to Ireland and the author holds it up in clear detail within.If you are expecting even a factual timeline or easy to follow, plotted story, you may be disappointed This is a spiritual journey as much as it is anything else But in that way, it pays great respect to its main character and his theology as well as the incessant motion of the sea travel that shaped his life If these things interest you, this book will touch your heart I ve read several of Llywelyn s books throughout the years, and some I ve loved, some I ve just thought were okay This one falls into the just okay category for me While her traditional style of writing with high descriptions is still present, Brendan, for me, just wasn t a historical figure that spoke to me, and as a result I found the book to be a bit lackluster Continued reading because the author truly has a way with descriptions, but it was one that I could have foregone and not felt t I ve read several of Llywelyn s books throughout the years, and some I ve loved, some I ve just thought were okay This one falls into the just okay category for me While her traditional style of writing with high descriptions is still present, Brendan, for me, just wasn t a historical figure that spoke to me, and as a result I found the book to be a bit lackluster Continued reading because the author truly has a way with descriptions, but it was one that I could have foregone and not felt the lack This book was a difficult book for me to stomach The rambling, choppy writing style, the fictionalization of historic characters in obscene manners, the liberties taken with the history while providing no bibliography, see also, or references used I really can t recommend this book Worst 3.00 I ever spent in a clearance section.I had high hopes for this novel as St Brendan is my patron saint and I grew up being read stories of St Brendan Ms Llywelyn dashed any interest for me in any of he This book was a difficult book for me to stomach The rambling, choppy writing style, the fictionalization of historic characters in obscene manners, the liberties taken with the history while providing no bibliography, see also, or references used I really can t recommend this book Worst 3.00 I ever spent in a clearance section.I had high hopes for this novel as St Brendan is my patron saint and I grew up being read stories of St Brendan Ms Llywelyn dashed any interest for me in any of her of her other works Llewelyn has written an interesting account of the life and voyages of Brendan of Clonfert and his various monasteries,as well as his associates I did find it a bit disconcerting in the way various time ones were developed, although each line was set in its own distinctive typeface At the end of his life, Brendan says The miracles I had seen were mine to see A different person might have seen something else, but I must look out of the eyes God Gave me A reminder to look at life with eyes o Llewelyn has written an interesting account of the life and voyages of Brendan of Clonfert and his various monasteries,as well as his associates I did find it a bit disconcerting in the way various time ones were developed, although each line was set in its own distinctive typeface At the end of his life, Brendan says The miracles I had seen were mine to see A different person might have seen something else, but I must look out of the eyes God Gave me A reminder to look at life with eyes open to the miracles that surround us I have never read any books written by Morgan Llywelyn before I really don t know anything about St Brendan either Her writing style struck me as very allegorical Now I m interested in reading something historical about Brendan I have never read any books written by Morgan Llywelyn before I really don t know anything about St Brendan either Her writing style struck me as very allegorical Now I m interested in reading something historical about Brendan Love the story and learning the history Morgan Llywelyn is one of my all time favorite authors I love her take on Celtic history and mythology particularly the way she can tell larger than life stories and still not lose sight of the individual people at the heart of the legend Her latest book, Brendan, tells the story of St Brendan the Navigator who, according to legend, sailed off to find Paradise, visiting many fantastic places and having many incredible adventures along the way It reminded me a lot of an Irish Christian ve Morgan Llywelyn is one of my all time favorite authors I love her take on Celtic history and mythology particularly the way she can tell larger than life stories and still not lose sight of the individual people at the heart of the legend Her latest book, Brendan, tells the story of St Brendan the Navigator who, according to legend, sailed off to find Paradise, visiting many fantastic places and having many incredible adventures along the way It reminded me a lot of an Irish Christian version of Homer s Odyssey I can t say that Brendan will ever be my favorite Morgan Llywelyn book It never quite lives up to Llywelyn s best Lion of Ireland, Bard The Odyssey of the Irish, Red Branch, or Finn MacCool but it was an interesting read.EDIT It s been a couple of days since I read and reviewed Brendan and I think I have finally figured out what it is that falls short in this book It feels rushed like the author has just sort of skimmed the story The set up is similar tosuccessful Morgan Llywelyn books a single, legendary character leading a band of brothers on a great adventure But in Red Branch, you REALLY got to know the members of the Red Branch They had histories and personalities and you cared what happened to them They were important to the story and important to the reader In Finn Mac Cool, the warriors of the Fianna were fleshed out characters goals and ambitions, skills and weaknesses Llywelyn didn t ignore them and focus completely on Finn That wasn t the case for Brendan A couple of his fellow monks were fleshed out but for the most part they were faceless, inter changeable props There were three characters that traveled with Brendan on his famous journey that never even received names And at times, the story was a bit light Each stop on the journey to Paradise was brief, only a couple of pages and other than losing an occasional un named character, never really seemed to have much of an impact on anything that came afterwards Don t get me wrong, there were parts of Brendan that were interesting to read but do not take this book to be a good example of a Morgan Llywelyn book She has written many books that are much, much better Set in Sixth Century Ireland, the novel reads like a biography of Brendan the Navigator, one of the most renown Irish saints While it s primarily written in the third person, the narrative is interspersed with the saint s first person recollections as if he was writing his memoir, as well as passages that purport to be from The Voyage of Saint Brendan, his personal account of his most legendary journey.Brendan s mentor is Bishop Erc, one of Saint Patrick s original disciples and a former drui Set in Sixth Century Ireland, the novel reads like a biography of Brendan the Navigator, one of the most renown Irish saints While it s primarily written in the third person, the narrative is interspersed with the saint s first person recollections as if he was writing his memoir, as well as passages that purport to be from The Voyage of Saint Brendan, his personal account of his most legendary journey.Brendan s mentor is Bishop Erc, one of Saint Patrick s original disciples and a former druid, and the connection between the druids and the early Irish clerics is one of theinteresting aspects of this novel Erc wants Brendan to become an ordained priest, but Brendan s wanderlust spoils the bishop s plans Eventually, Brendan convinces Erc to allow him to go on a pilgrimage across Ireland the first of many such travels and it s these journeys that shape Brendan s life.His journeys also make him famous, allowing him to attract a variety of followers, including a pet raven named Preachan, who provides some of the novel stouching scenes Brendan ends up founding two monasteries, including Clonfert, where he became abbot later in life Yet it is his final journey a voyage across the Atlantic in search of Paradise for which he is best known, and the tale of that journey weaves itself in short narratives throughout nearly every chapter of the book While the rest of the novel is clearly grounded in reality, this final voyage isof a mystical, spiritual journey, complete with angels and other miraculous happenings that reminded me a good bit of C.S Lewis The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.My one criticism is that the conflict level is fairly low throughout the story, which made the book too easy at times to put down I kept reminding myself, however, that this was never intended to be an adventure tale, but rather an introspective and spiritual journey amid a backdrop of early Celtic Christianity Fortunately, Saint Brendan is a likeable and admirable character, so following him on his journeys was enjoyable enough and made for a fulfilling read {READ DOWNLOAD} ¼ Brendan ⚹ This is the story of Saint Brend n the Navigator, whose legendary quest to find the Isle of the Blessed is one of the most remarkable and enduring of early Christian tales Among Irish saints, Brend n the Navigator is second only to Patrick Founder of several Christian monasteries, he most famously guided a group of monks on a dangerous journey into the unknown vastn Sigh A book about an ancient Irish saint There s so much potential there It started out enticingly with this Brendan fella on this voyage to paradise As in, literally, he thought he could reach heaven by boat, by sailing west from Ireland So that was cool, some mystical stuff, the rawness of a new faith still feeling the effects of the influence of paganism But the whole pagan thing was too underplayed It started out with these references to these mysterious hooded figures, the druids, an Sigh A book about an ancient Irish saint There s so much potential there It started out enticingly with this Brendan fella on this voyage to paradise As in, literally, he thought he could reach heaven by boat, by sailing west from Ireland So that was cool, some mystical stuff, the rawness of a new faith still feeling the effects of the influence of paganism But the whole pagan thing was too underplayed It started out with these references to these mysterious hooded figures, the druids, and they were like dememtors or something, and deliciously scary Then they were nothing but vague ideological enemies, not really even any conflict with them at all I really wanted there to be scary druids and pagan craziness Not so much Then the narrative style It was a bit much Passages about the journey to paradise are like intermittent travelogues interrupting the chronological story The voyage is taken late in Brendan s life the narrative starts with him as a young boy and are printed in BOLD FONT Most of the book is written in third person, Brendan this, Brendan that Then it would jump in with little diary of Brendan things, where it was all in the first person AND ITALICIZED THEN, IN ADDITION, there were these other passages, in quotation marks, again like a diary, again in first person, but not in italics And although none of this was prohibitive to comprehension, it seemed a bit much