#FREE DOWNLOAD ⚟ The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell ⚛ eBook or E-pub free

Going into this I had very high hopes, which were somewhat let down A book about hallucinogenic drugs and altered mind states written by author of famed science fiction novel Brave New World which, as of writing, I have yet to read Being that I have dabbled in the use of psychedelics and studied countless writings on hallucinogens and alteration of mind states, a topic that greatly fascinates me, not to mention my love for sci fi, I really expectedfrom this I was deeply disappointed Going into this I had very high hopes, which were somewhat let down A book about hallucinogenic drugs and altered mind states written by author of famed science fiction novel Brave New World which, as of writing, I have yet to read Being that I have dabbled in the use of psychedelics and studied countless writings on hallucinogens and alteration of mind states, a topic that greatly fascinates me, not to mention my love for sci fi, I really expectedfrom this I was deeply disappointed mostly Contained within the book are two parts The Doors of Perception and Heaven Hell, as the title informs The Doors of Perception focuses on the author s experience with mescaline I did not like it.It comes off as preachy and even pretentious Pretentious being a word I don t use loosely, seeing as how I feel it is often misused misinterpreted and wrongly attributed to some truly great artistic and intellectual people There s not even much psychology in here, and even less science The author just goes on about there being a correct way of seeing the world and a layman s way The former only achieved by a special certain few, such as artists or those who achieve said vision through drug use It s all boring and, to simply put it, fairly stupid Psychedelics, or drugs in general for that matter, do not unlock or expand parts of your mind They merely allow you to look at things in a new, different way They do not make you any smarter, save for the things learned through the experience of taking them This is why many great musicians or artists are greatly, even directly, influenced by drugs, because with drugs they see things in a new light that many people never noticed before due to the routine of conventional thinking, which makes their art appear to be fresh and unique Artistic even The second part is basically the same However, what makes this book worth reading is the forty or so pages at the end of Heaven and Hell, entitled Appendices I found these pages to be the best and most fascinating The author talks about pattern inducing stroboscopic lamps something I was not very knowledgeable on , potential affects hallucinations had on religions in the past, the affect technology has had on art, and schizophrenia, among other things So yes, the appendices are better than the actual book There wasn t really much in here that I wasn t already aware of, but even with the bulk of it being mediocre with the rest really shining, I can easily recommend this Especially to those interested in altered mind states or psychedelics, or even surrealism Teenage KicksI read this book in the early 70 s in my early teenage years The first thing about The Doors of Perception is that it was the source of the name of the band, The Doors The second is that it shaped the views of many people about drugs for 20 years.Aldous Huxley came from a scientific as well as a creative background For me, it gave him some level of credibility when assessing the merits of psychedelic drugs Basically, I think he argued that the psychedelic experience could Teenage KicksI read this book in the early 70 s in my early teenage years The first thing about The Doors of Perception is that it was the source of the name of the band, The Doors The second is that it shaped the views of many people about drugs for 20 years.Aldous Huxley came from a scientific as well as a creative background For me, it gave him some level of credibility when assessing the merits of psychedelic drugs Basically, I think he argued that the psychedelic experience could open the doors of additional powers of perception, over and above the rational I can t remember anything about Heaven and Hell, but in retrospect you could build an argument that drugs opened the door to Hell, just as much as anyone could have argued that they opened the door to Heaven.No matter what your views about drugs, you have to acknowledge that the drugs of that period are different to today.In those days, they were probablynatural, butimpure.Nowadays, they are industrial, concentrated, focussed, powerful, dangerous, unless it suits someone in the supply chain to introduce impurities, in which case they are evendangerous.You can t afford to be romantic about some back to nature experience.Nowadays, you are wrestling with a whole other beast #FREE DOWNLOAD é The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell Ä As only he can, Aldous Huxley explores the mind s remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness These two astounding essays are among the most profound studies of the effects of mind expanding drugs written in this century Contains the complete texts ofThe Doors of PerceptionandHeaven and Hell , both of which became essential for the counterculture during the s and influenced a generation s perception of life There are things known and there are things unknownand in between are the doors The Doors of Perception Why should you read it 1 If you want to question the mind 2 If you want an insight into psychedelics i.e if you haven t already tried any form of hallucinogens yet 3 If you want to know about theunknownand its difference with the known.4 If you want to know what is the difference between a deranged schizophrenic and a normal brain and what defines a brain, normal and labe There are things known and there are things unknownand in between are the doors The Doors of Perception Why should you read it 1 If you want to question the mind 2 If you want an insight into psychedelics i.e if you haven t already tried any form of hallucinogens yet 3 If you want to know about theunknownand its difference with the known.4 If you want to know what is the difference between a deranged schizophrenic and a normal brain and what defines a brain, normal and labels a visionary, mad 5 If you want to read the richness of the text used to describe the philosophical treatment of the mystical experience 6 If you are a Morrison fan 7 Lastly, If you want toBREAK ON THROUGH TO THE OTHER SIDEPlease use theDOORS OF PERCEPTION Doors of Perception is a deeply interesting short essay by the famous author Aldous Huxley In 1953 he was involved in a controlled experiment into the psychological effects of the drug mescalin What he describes is less a mere hallucinatory experience andan opening of his ability to percieve, and to see himself as part of the Oneness of the universe He argues quite correctly that a massive part of the function of the brain is to selectively discard sensory input, keeping only what is Doors of Perception is a deeply interesting short essay by the famous author Aldous Huxley In 1953 he was involved in a controlled experiment into the psychological effects of the drug mescalin What he describes is less a mere hallucinatory experience andan opening of his ability to percieve, and to see himself as part of the Oneness of the universe He argues quite correctly that a massive part of the function of the brain is to selectively discard sensory input, keeping only what is important in the here and now and relates to our immediate survival ability The effect of mescalin, as also felt through sensory deprivation, oxygen starvation, hypnosis, and other sources, is to bypass the brain valve and receiveof the useless information And it is through that that we can perceive ourselves as we truly are, part of the All.In Heaven and Hell, the follow up essay to Doors of Perception, Aldous Huxley revisits the topic of visions in the context of the social and spiritual import of these experiences Through the essay which is a considerably tougher read than Doors of Perception Huxley discusses the history of vision creating stimulus and how as time has progressed we have become desensitised to a lot of the vision inspiring beauty that was used to such great extent in the religions of the past Towards the end of his life Aldous Huxley was introduced to psychedelics, still legal at that time His analyses of the phenomenon are detailed in these two essays here combined in one volume For further reading about his relationship to such drugs see, of course, the various biographies about Huxley, particularly Huxley in Hollywood, and his wife s collection of essays by and about him and these drugs entitled Moksha For his use of his experiences in literature see his novel Island.Though dat Towards the end of his life Aldous Huxley was introduced to psychedelics, still legal at that time His analyses of the phenomenon are detailed in these two essays here combined in one volume For further reading about his relationship to such drugs see, of course, the various biographies about Huxley, particularly Huxley in Hollywood, and his wife s collection of essays by and about him and these drugs entitled Moksha For his use of his experiences in literature see his novel Island.Though dated, much of what Huxley surmises about the way psychedelics work still corresponds in a general way with contemporary theory and all of what he writes in describing the psychedelic experience is quite well done.Note that Huxley was legally blind throughout most of his life a reason for his fascination with his pelucid inner vision Based on his own experience with mescalin, Huxley informs us about the true nature of reality, that is, the sheer scope of it He doesn t stop at great works of art, shizophrenia or religion, but freely connects his intake of this drug to an ambitious bundle of themes in order to supplement them all and to prescribe someof the same, or at least similar, medicine Drugs and transcendence life in general had always have much in common, but his way of preaching is exactly like what his drug e Based on his own experience with mescalin, Huxley informs us about the true nature of reality, that is, the sheer scope of it He doesn t stop at great works of art, shizophrenia or religion, but freely connects his intake of this drug to an ambitious bundle of themes in order to supplement them all and to prescribe someof the same, or at least similar, medicine Drugs and transcendence life in general had always have much in common, but his way of preaching is exactly like what his drug encounter warns him against.The description of his adventure would be muchrevealing, if it hadn t elevate into a lecture about two ancient categories of being, one experienced through our everyday life, where language represents a barrier between us and the world, and the other one of true essence that can be reached only through some transcendental activity such as taking drugs Although his expedition to the sphere of pure perception shows him the limitations of words and all of our classifications, it seems he identifies his trip with as many concepts and theories as he possibly can He makes a paradigm of pure being out of it, which selfless as it is, is based on one sole experiment of his humble self Little is left of this experiment but widespread doctrines, which just fit too neatly I wonder how much previous knowledge affected his experience or how much posterior interpretations transversed it and I got the feeling he didn t quite catch its uniqness, or as he would said, suchness.Or perhaps it was just his forceful implications I have troubles with When he doesn t generalize, he does his best his charachterisation of draperies in the baroque paintings is just beautiful Aldous Huxley munches on some Mescaline four tenths of a gram, means nothing to me as a clean living soul as a guinea pig, experimenting for a friend He expects some kind of visionary experience, a la Blake, but as he admits, he is a poor visualiser and experiences less than the visions described and painted by artists, because gifted artists, according to him, have a little pipeline to the Mind At Large which by passes the brain valve and the ego filter Unlike gifted artists, by an eff Aldous Huxley munches on some Mescaline four tenths of a gram, means nothing to me as a clean living soul as a guinea pig, experimenting for a friend He expects some kind of visionary experience, a la Blake, but as he admits, he is a poor visualiser and experiences less than the visions described and painted by artists, because gifted artists, according to him, have a little pipeline to the Mind At Large which by passes the brain valve and the ego filter Unlike gifted artists, by an effort of will I can evoke a not very vivid image says Huxley What he sees are some golden lights, the intricacies of design in nature, trips out on the Allness and Infinity of folded cloth in his trousers haha , is struck by lively dissonance of colours, experiences the is ness of things, the Istigkeit, the infinite value and meaningfulness of existence , things quivering under the pressure of the significance with which they are charged, sees simple things charged with meaning and mystery of existence etc etc., and comes to conclusion that brain is eliminative, not productive, filtering out what we don t need in order to survive, protecting us from being overwhelmed and confused, or going insane, since we know all, remember all, about everything, everywhere in the universe This is the finite mind, the Mind at large.Huxley discusses the idea that we all crave the release from Reality the urge to transcend is a principal appetite of the soul , through some kind of soma drug, to reach these what he calls antipodes of the mind, the universal and ever present urge for self transcendence, Wells the door in the wall, the need for chemical vacations from intolerable selfhood He later discusses how we achieve this through religious ceremony, drug taking, etc In second part he discusses indetail these antipodes of the mind, claiming that we dream in black and white, which is not true may be true for Huxley, the poor visualiser , and the scintillating things we create to bring us the visionary experience, like vivid paintings, fireworks, lights, even theatre lights and costume jewellery bit of a stretch , and the resplendence of royal ceremonial dress another bit of a stretch , etc etc things which give us a reminder of those things we see in that other world , whatever in nature or a work of art resembles one of those intensely significant inwardly flowing objects encountered at the mind s antipodes is capable of inducing if only in partial attenuated form, the visionary experience He uses this to explain our inexplicable passion for gems, shiny objects, jewellery, vivid colours in painting, stained glass windows, glass, chrome, the beauty of curved reflections and softly lustrous glazes etc., things that transport the beholder, as a reminder of preternatural colours and intensity of the other world.He bangs on about this for page after page, but where the book gets good is where he starts discussing the numinous quality of certain works of art, like landscape painting as a vision inducing art form, the distances and propinquity in same, things isolated from their utilitarian context, medieval art, renaissance art, things seen and rendered as living jewels, things of visionary intensity, transfigured and therefore transporting.Later he discusses schizophrenics as negative visionaries for a healthy person perception of the infinite in a finite particular is a revelation of divine immanence , not so for the mentally ill They are transfigured by their visions, but for the worse He also discusses religious punishments, self flagellation, hypnosis, fasting, vitamin deficiencies, Mortification of the body etc., as a means of reaching those antipodes of the mind by increasing the CO2 to lower efficiency of the brain as a reducing valve and permit the entry into that other world , to experience the visionary or mystical from out there , also including things like prolonged shouting, praying, chanting, etc to experience the intense significance of things that give us God s immanence , because, in a nutshell, the brain is chemically controlled and therefore can be made permeable to the superfluous aspects of mind at large by modifying the normal chemistry of the body.An important little book that warrants re reading Have you ever had to be the designated driver while your buddies got wasted Watching them laugh at nothing and behave like asses while you re unfortunately stone cold sober is a pretty miserable experience as your mind hasn t been altered by chemicals Reading The Doors of Perception is like this Aldous Huxley does mescaline and then describes it extensively to the bored reader who is probably not on mescaline And it s not nearly as fascinating as Huxley believes it to be because we re Have you ever had to be the designated driver while your buddies got wasted Watching them laugh at nothing and behave like asses while you re unfortunately stone cold sober is a pretty miserable experience as your mind hasn t been altered by chemicals Reading The Doors of Perception is like this Aldous Huxley does mescaline and then describes it extensively to the bored reader who is probably not on mescaline And it s not nearly as fascinating as Huxley believes it to be because we re probably not on mescaline I know I wasn t when reading this crap The Doors of Perception is a 50 page essay and it s sequel, Heaven and Hell , a 33 page essay, read like far longer works because they re so unreadable The point of the essays is that Huxley believes there isto human nature than the base level of survival and that it s because of how our species has developed that has made us forget ways in which we can perceive things beyond the ordinary He wants to allow people to experience mescaline in order to see things he believes are there but beyond our reach without the help of hallucinogenics And here s the big problem I have with this view it s that assuming that what you experience while high is worthand isreal than what you experience everyday I mean, what you re experiencing is simulated with the aid of chemicals why would it bereal than reality A problem endemic to this book is that Huxley is talking about experiences that are purely visceral and beyond man made constructs such as language and are therefore indescribable yet he s trying to describe them with language Which is why you get drivel like this I spent several minutes or was it several centuries not merely gazing at those bamboo legs, but actually being them or rather being myself in them or, to be stillaccurate for I was not involved in the case, nor in a certain sense were they being my Not self in the Not self which was the chair p.10 Confronted by a chair which looked like the Last Judgement or, to beaccurate, by a Last Judgement which, after a long time and with considerable difficulty, I recognized as a chair I found myself all at once on the brink of panic p.33Good lord, this crap goes on and on for nearly a 100 pages and it doesn t help that he s not a very good writer to start with His rambling style fused with a dry, almost academic, vernacular makes reading this book of insubstantial observations and half formed ideas all theinsufferable All he proves is that drugs make intelligent people sound like morons.He feebly attempts to make the argument that researchers and scientists don t take spiritual experiences seriously because they can t see it, measure it, rationalise it, in any scientific way Duh He bewails methods eg taking mescaline that allegedly make youperceptive,intensely aware of inward and outward reality, andopen to the spirit which constitute the non verbal humanities aren t takenseriously Well, when you put it like that, AldousHe attempts to rectify this by constantly referencing William Blake, Homer, and Goethe in an effort to make the essay appear academic and therefore substantial and worthy of consideration It s truly pretentious and pathetic in its ineffectiveness This quote basically sums up the essays Those folds in the trousers what a labyrinth of endlessly significant complexity And the texture of the grey flannel how rich, how deeply, mysteriously sumptuous p.16Wooaaaah, Aldous got fucked up on mescaline Men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty billows of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, and pass themselves by St Augustine, from ConfessionsIf you are like me, you have some reservations about trying drugs even psychedelic ones I know one of the people that I look up to Carl Sagan was a fairly regular marijuana smoker I know Richard Feynman, another one of my heroes , tried some drugs, but stopped at s Men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty billows of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, and pass themselves by St Augustine, from ConfessionsIf you are like me, you have some reservations about trying drugs even psychedelic ones I know one of the people that I look up to Carl Sagan was a fairly regular marijuana smoker I know Richard Feynman, another one of my heroes , tried some drugs, but stopped at some point as he grew afraid of damaging his brain somehow and losing his abilities in mathematics and physics But the allure is there Like Ishmael in Moby Dick I have an everlasting itch for things remote , but for me it s not remote, but rather quite the opposite it s an itch to explore my own mind It s an enticing idea, you must admit to fully delve into your own consciousnes, to see everything everywhere at once without even moving to feel at peace with everything quite possibly to feel that you ve figured out the riddle that is human existence I can t help but think that it would be a mistake never to have such an experience during this very short and most likely only experience of consciousness I ll have Huxley, in his Doors of Perception essay doesn t make it seem like any less of a mistake.Early in May 1953, Aldous Huxley volunteered to trip on mescaline in the name of science The Doors of Perception consists, in its first part, of Huxley recounting his experiences on the drug, and in its second, shorter half of an argument for the usage of psychedelic drugs in order to ooze past the reducing valve of brain and ego, into consciousness It s an incredibly fascinating essay There is in particular one remarkably cool idea brought up, quoting the philosopher C.D Broad,that we should do well to consider muchseriously than we have hitherto been inclined to do the type of theory which Henri Bergson put forward in connection with memory and sense perception The suggestion is that the function of the brain and nervous system and sense organs is in the main eliminative and not productive Each person is at each moment capable of remembering all that has ever happened to him and of perceiving everything that is happening everywhere in the universe The function of the brain and the nervous system is to protect us from being overwhelmed and confused by this mass of largely useless and irrelevant knowledge, by shutting out most of what we should otherwise perceive or remember at any moment, and leaving only very small and special selection which is likely to be practically usefulAs such, the consciousness we experience has gone through a reducing valve , so that our experience of consciousness does not overwhelm us However, with drugs, you can let someconsciousness seep through the no longer watertight valve of the brain and nervous system It is then that there is an obscure knowledge that All is in all that All is actually each And this is, writes Huxley, just about as near, I take it, as a finite mind can ever come to perceiving everything that is happening everywhere in the universe This essay was extremely fascinating I ll skip writing anything about Heaven and Hell, as, honestly, I found it to be pretty boring But read The Doors of Perception It s brilliant