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!Read Ebook ⚤ Night ⚠ Born in the town of Sighet, Transylvania, Elie Wiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home into Auschwitz concentration camp, and then to Buchenwald Night is the terrifying record of Elie Wiesel s memories of the death of his family, the death of his own innocence, and his despair as a deeply observant Jew confronting the absolute evil of man This new translation by his wife and most frequent translator, Marion Wiesel, corrects important details and presents the most accurate rendering in English of Elie Wiesel s testimony to what happened in the camps and of his unforgettable message that this horror must simply never be allowed to happen again Terrifying I have read two books that described a nightmare, painted a picture of hell The second was Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy and first is Night I still think of this book sometimes and shudder and I realize that evil is never too far buried in us The scene where the line of doomed prisoners splits in two with Mengela conducting, a perverse parody of the last judgment seems ripped from Dante Terrifying I have read two books that described a nightmare, painted a picture of hell The second was Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy and first is Night I still think of this book sometimes and shudder and I realize that evil is never too far buried in us The scene where the line of doomed prisoners splits in two with Mengela conducting, a perverse parody of the last judgment seems ripped from Dante The author, who is actually in the above picture, said it best in the forwardOnly those who experienced Auschwitz know what it wasI think we can all agree with that But can we, the reader, even understand what happened there Can modern men and women comprehend that cursed universe I m not entirely sure.I first read this in my eighth grade History class I was 13 It changed my life Before this book my world was sunshine and rainbows My biggest concern was whether or not a boy named Ja The author, who is actually in the above picture, said it best in the forwardOnly those who experienced Auschwitz know what it wasI think we can all agree with that But can we, the reader, even understand what happened there Can modern men and women comprehend that cursed universe I m not entirely sure.I first read this in my eighth grade History class I was 13 It changed my life Before this book my world was sunshine and rainbows My biggest concern was whether or not a boy named Jason liked me back I got mad at my mom when she made me go to bed on time, I complained if I didn t like what we were having for dinner and I argued about what I was and wasn t allowed to watch on TV I thought I knew about WWII Both of my grandfathers served in it and so my parents wanted to make sure that we understood the sacrifices they made, the things they saw I watched documentaries about it with my father, the history nerd, listened to the few stories that my grandfathers would tell, but up until that point I had been intentionally sheltered from the horrors of the holocaust I had only been told in the vaguest terms what had happened, that so many millions of people had been killed, that Hitler and his men had sought to exterminate the Jewish people My parents wanted to spare me from what exactly that meant until they thought I was mature enough to be able to absorb it But then I read this And for the first time in my life I was completely self aware I felt like a child, like a complete and utter fool For what were my problems compared to those of this narrator How hard was my life compared to what he endured What millions of people similarly endured I now understood my own insignificance in the grand scheme of things and suddenly the reality of the world was a crushing weight It wasn t all sunshine and rainbows It was dark It was ugly and unforgiveable I remember getting really angry when I finished this Mostly I was angry at the world and at humanity as a whole but I unfairly turned some of that on my father After all, he hadn t prepared me for what I found in this book At one point I even demanded that he explain this thing to me He couldn t Fifteen years later, my second read of this book has impacted me just as much as the first There s this question I kept asking myself while reading That question, was How I m sure that Why might seem theobvious choice here but I couldn t let myself wander down the rabbit warren that is that question Madness lies at the end of it So I m left with How How did this happen How did so many average human beings contribute to this How did the SS working in the camps reach the point that they were physically and mentally able to toss live infants into flames How were the German girls that lived within smelling distance of Auschwitz able to pass love notes to the soldiers that marched their skeletal prisoners past How did these same starving prisoners manage to run 20 kilometers in the freezing snow How could the SS officers that shot them if they stopped on the first day of their death march then shout encouragements to them the next How could the German citizens near the train tracks throw bread into the prisoners cattle cars just to watch them murder each other for it How could human beings do these things to each other How HOW HOWLike my father, I have no answers.And that, I believe, is why many modern humans will never really be able to comprehend the things that happen in this book Absorb it, yes Bear witness to it, yes Understand it Hopefully never I finished this at lunch today And now I m sitting in my cubicle, glancing at my neighbors and wondering if they re capable of this kind of depravity Am I What would I do to survive Would I beat my own father to death for the bread in his hand I hope to God that none of us will ever have to find out the answers to these questions If you read a single book in your life, this should be it.Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest There is little that freaks me outthan the Holocaust And I m not belittling it at all with the phrase freaks me out Growing up in the 1970s and 80s, I felt sufficiently desensitized enough by television violence to be able to gauge how often I need to shake the jiffy pop and run to the bathroom before the program violence resumes.Elie Wiesel s Night brings me back to my senses, makes me hate the cold hearted bitch I ve learned to be And not by some overtly dramatic rendition of the ho There is little that freaks me outthan the Holocaust And I m not belittling it at all with the phrase freaks me out Growing up in the 1970s and 80s, I felt sufficiently desensitized enough by television violence to be able to gauge how often I need to shake the jiffy pop and run to the bathroom before the program violence resumes.Elie Wiesel s Night brings me back to my senses, makes me hate the cold hearted bitch I ve learned to be And not by some overtly dramatic rendition of the horrors of life in a concentration camp butof the LACK of it The down to the nitty gritty telling of what happened during the year that he was imprisoned It wasn t going for the kick to the gut reaction,of a confused, inconceivable retelling of day to day events, and this this is what really makes me shudder and be at a loss for words Hell, words Who am I kidding Try coherent thoughtI would pause at every sentence, and start over and over again I would conjure up other verbs, other images, other silent cries It still was not right But what exactly was It It was something elusive, darkly shrouded for fear of being usurped, profaned All the dictionary had to offer seemed meager, pale lifeless His description of his last encounter with his mother and little sisterAn SS came towards us wielding a club He commanded Men to the left Women to the right Eight words spoken quietly, indifferently, without emotion Eight simple, short words Yet that was the moment when I left my mother Words The power they can hold is devastating Yes, not a new thought, not an original one, yet fucking true nonetheless Buna Buchenwald Mengele Auschwitz Words, but ones that incite something within Creepy crawlies or nausea Fear I have met only one Holocaust survivor, that I m aware of And met is too strong a word I was working in a store during college and was collecting payment from a customer who handed me the money and flashed his tattoo I paled My eyes darted from the faded black green numbers that served as this man s identity to his face and knew that I was just another gawker That in that one moment I had created a history for this man No he WAS history Certainly makes you rethink being pissed off that Sbarro s had left the food court I think that my kids will most likely never meet a survivor That books like Night and Anne Frank will have to serve as an education, a reminder that THIS, in fact, DID happen and that it is cruel and moronic and downright irresponsible to believe otherwise I could say that I did have some sense of relief that at least I wasn t alive during this That I didn t sit back and have some vague understanding of this going on But, that s not really the case, right We have Rwanda and Darfur and god knows what other insane situations happening out there and we re outraged over the price of an iPhoneFor in the end, it is all about memory, its sources and its magnitude, and, of course, its consequences So, Elie Wiesel s account, at 112 pages, serves as a powerful, undeniable, testament As simply stated as that Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, that turned my life into one long night seven times sealed.Never shall I forget that smoke.Never shall I forget the small faces of the children whose bodies I saw transformed into smoke under a silent sky.Never shall I forget those flames that consumed my faith forever.Never shall I forget the nocturnal silence that deprived me for all eternity of the desire to live Never shall I forget those moments that murdered my God and my soul and tuned my dreams to ashes.Never shall I forget those things, even were I condemned to live as long as God Himself Never And in the Preface to the New Translation, he saysAnd yet still I wonder Have I used the right words For me, yes Most definitely, yes Our lives no longer belong to us alone they belong to all those who need us desperately Elie Wiesel