{Epub} ⚢ Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare õ eBook or E-pub free

This is an excellent analysis of the US child welfare system and how ridiculously broken it is While the general view of foster care is that children are only taken from their families when they are abused or grossly neglected, the truth is that many children especially black children are taken from their families for no reason other than that they are poor return return And because regardless of how true it is for individual cases, as a whole, biological parents are coded as black and fos This is an excellent analysis of the US child welfare system and how ridiculously broken it is While the general view of foster care is that children are only taken from their families when they are abused or grossly neglected, the truth is that many children especially black children are taken from their families for no reason other than that they are poor return return And because regardless of how true it is for individual cases, as a whole, biological parents are coded as black and foster parents are coded as white, so the government is willing to spend tons of money on foster parents for example, in California, not only foster parents, but also parents who adopt through the state get paid monthly for each child until they turn eighteen, plus the children can go to any UC or Cal State school for free , but is unwilling to instead spend that money on helping poor families so that their kids aren t taken from them in the first place simply because they had too small an apartment or couldn t afford a babysitter or had no food in the house or were homeless return return The book lays out how the current system ends up harming not just children by taking them away often unnecessarily from their families but the black community in general, and the unconsious racism that drives the decisions to favor placing children in foster care and terminating parental rights rather than working to keep families together Again a required text book for one of my classes, and again a very good book When you have 4 kids and life seems overwhelming reading books like this make me stop complaining, yelling at my kids, or not appreciating my husband That might be one of the greatest aspects of reading really tough things like this book, in doing a real look at how great my life is in comparison to the many women in this book Dorothy Roberts is a very compelling writer, although if you don t want to hear about issue Again a required text book for one of my classes, and again a very good book When you have 4 kids and life seems overwhelming reading books like this make me stop complaining, yelling at my kids, or not appreciating my husband That might be one of the greatest aspects of reading really tough things like this book, in doing a real look at how great my life is in comparison to the many women in this book Dorothy Roberts is a very compelling writer, although if you don t want to hear about issues of race you won t like this book She is a successful and talented attorney and writer who does so much to help single mothers I liked the book, however, it is a little bit confusing, and really took some teasing out for me to do my final essay on it It was like Dorothy Roberts followed me around every day at work Crazy and haunting and frustrating and outrageous This book is a must read. Nice review of data about institutionalized racism in the foster care system by a law professor Best chapter was the one on the history of welfare programs Also important was the point about how many children are taken away directly as a result of poverty under the rubric of neglect when there isn t any harm done to kids by the parents, but, for example, they live in a home that is not up to code and don t have money to fix it Somehow the system has come to the conclusion that expensive Nice review of data about institutionalized racism in the foster care system by a law professor Best chapter was the one on the history of welfare programs Also important was the point about how many children are taken away directly as a result of poverty under the rubric of neglect when there isn t any harm done to kids by the parents, but, for example, they live in a home that is not up to code and don t have money to fix it Somehow the system has come to the conclusion that expensive and damaging foster care is better than a couple hundred bucks to fix dangerous wiring.My main complaint about this book is that it wasn t sure whether it was an academic book or a general readership one Certainly the cover and the way it was styled made it look like a general readership one, but the actual book read muchlike a textbook Despite the content, very non polemic, just the facts, ma am There were many things mentioned in passing that sounded like fascinating bits of history for the general reader for example, something about placements based on skin tone and hair texture that unfortunately weren t fleshed out in favor ofdata, and only treated with a reference to source material that is somewhat obscure in an endnote Still a good read Roberts is occasionally a bit too extreme and i think overreaches her hypotheses but it s still an interesting read, and a good look at some of the problems within the current child welfare system If you re looking for an overview, I d recommend supplementing the book with other references, like Conlan s discussion of new federalism in the welfare state and Bartholet s evaluation of the child welfare system. Overall the author makes good points about racism and its detrimental affects on black children and black families, as it pertains to child welfare I agree with her that too many children are being removed, whether black or otherwise I also agree that in order to address child welfare, we must address racism, poverty, and quit punishing people for being poor or non white I do wonder though, if she s glossing over the number of children in the system who were actually abused in their home, a Overall the author makes good points about racism and its detrimental affects on black children and black families, as it pertains to child welfare I agree with her that too many children are being removed, whether black or otherwise I also agree that in order to address child welfare, we must address racism, poverty, and quit punishing people for being poor or non white I do wonder though, if she s glossing over the number of children in the system who were actually abused in their home, as she claims these are very rare cases This book gave me A LOT to think over Some of the points made in this book I just can t get behind I was particularly bothered by what I perceive as a lax attitude toward neglect and not enough discussion about the drawbacks to focusing so heavily on family reunification as a goal in CPS cases Still, I have to give this book credit for being very thought provoking and making me want to learnabout the history of child welfare in the US. As always a well written and well researched work from Dorothy Roberts She breaks down the institutional racism and bias that black children and families face when dealing with the child welfare system It is one of my top 5 reproductive justice must reads. {Epub} â Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare ⚫ Shattered Bonds is a stirring account of a worsening American social crisis the disproportionate representation of black children in the US foster care system and its effects on black communities and the country as a whole Tying the origins and impact of this disparity to racial injustice, Dorothy Roberts contends that child welfare policy reflects a political choice to address startling rates of black child poverty by punishing parents instead of tackling poverty s societal roots Using conversations with mothers battling the Chicago child welfare system for custody of their children, along with national data, Roberts levels a powerful indictment of racial disparities in foster care and tells a moving story of the women and children who earn our respect in their fight to keep their families intact Truly a must read for everyone devoted to social justice issues, but especially those who have worked in the child welfare system or plan to.