@DOWNLOAD BOOK ô The Age of the Bachelor: Creating an American Subculture õ eBook or E-pub free

@DOWNLOAD BOOK õ The Age of the Bachelor: Creating an American Subculture ⛄ In this engaging new book, Howard Chudacoff describes a special and fascinating world the urban bachelor life that took shape in the late nineteenth century, when a significant population of single men migrated to American cities Rejecting the restraints and dependence of the nineteenth century family, bachelors found sustenance and camaraderie in the boarding houses, saloons, pool halls, cafes, clubs, and other institutions that arose in response to their increasing numbers Richly illustrated, anecdotal, and including a unique analysis of The National Police Gazette the most outrageous and popular men s publication of the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century , this book is the first to describe a complex subculture that continues to affect the larger meanings of manhood and manliness in American society The figure of the bachelor with its emphasis on pleasure, self indulgence, and public entertainment was easily converted by the burgeoning consumer culture at the turn of the century into an ambiguously appealing image of masculinity Finding an easy reception in an atmosphere of insecurity about manhood, that image has outdistanced the circumstances in which it began to flourish and far outlasted the bachelor culture that produced it Thus, the idea of the bachelor has retained its somewhat negative but alluring connotations throughout the rest of the twentieth century Chudacoff s concluding chapter discusses the contemporary singles scene now developing as the number of single people in urban centers is again increasing By seeing bachelorhood as a stage in life for many and a permanent status for some, Chudacoff recalls a lifestyle that had a profound impact on society, evoking fear, disdain, repugnance, and at the same time a sense of romance, excitement, and freedom The book contributes to gender history, family history, urban history, and the study of consumer culture and will appeal to anyone curious about American history and anxious to acquire a new view of a sometimes forgotten but still influential aspect of our national past Kirkus Reviews A highly readable overview of the creation and recreation of a bachelor subculture in urban America. From the late nineteenth century to about World War II the marriage rate in the United States dropped, resulting in a high percentage of single men Consequently, as this phenomenon occured allong with urbanization and industrialization, many institutions and associations, ranging from rooming houses to saloons to the YMCA arose to meet the needs of these men, all of which resulted in the development of a bachelor subculture While accessible to the general reader, Chudacoff s book is very much From the late nineteenth century to about World War II the marriage rate in the United States dropped, resulting in a high percentage of single men Consequently, as this phenomenon occured allong with urbanization and industrialization, many institutions and associations, ranging from rooming houses to saloons to the YMCA arose to meet the needs of these men, all of which resulted in the development of a bachelor subculture While accessible to the general reader, Chudacoff s book is very much an academic study Some of the chapters are heavy on statistics, which might make heavy going for some readers This is an excellent work of social history that contributes a new angle to our understanding of American society A fascinating and informative history of American bachelor culture The author reviews a variety of primary and secondary sources to paint an evolving picture of bachelors The essential argument is that economic and social conditions intertwined to create mostly urban conditions that altered the way that men interacted with the world around them Obliterates any notion that men have always been or that manly behaviors are products of biology I take away a strong sense that institutions and A fascinating and informative history of American bachelor culture The author reviews a variety of primary and secondary sources to paint an evolving picture of bachelors The essential argument is that economic and social conditions intertwined to create mostly urban conditions that altered the way that men interacted with the world around them Obliterates any notion that men have always been or that manly behaviors are products of biology I take away a strong sense that institutions and popular culture play a powerful role in the types of human beings we produce as a society Overall it is heavy on census data but an informative read and a n impressive body of work