[[ Kindle ]] ↭ The Fall and Rise of China ☟ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

It was not my fault the Gang of Four poisoned my mind as I held up five fingers with the implication being that Mao was at fault too I think I ll blame them too for me not having had known anything about China history since 1750 including how creepy the British were with their Boxer Rebellion and foisting opium on to the Chinese masses in order to enrich the coffers of the British, or for have not knowing what Maoism meant and how cults can lead to a cultural revolution , starvation and mass It was not my fault the Gang of Four poisoned my mind as I held up five fingers with the implication being that Mao was at fault too I think I ll blame them too for me not having had known anything about China history since 1750 including how creepy the British were with their Boxer Rebellion and foisting opium on to the Chinese masses in order to enrich the coffers of the British, or for have not knowing what Maoism meant and how cults can lead to a cultural revolution , starvation and mass murder You ever notice that no matter where you are in the world the last refuge of a scoundrel is patriotism , and when Samuel Johnson said that he surely meant exclusive patriotism the kind of patriotism that morphs into Nationalism The lecturer points out that the heroes of Tiananmen Square were called unpatriotic by the authoritarian oligarchy who was ruling over China at the time No matter where or when we are in space or time scoundrels appeal to patriotism in order to justify their privileges and enslavement of the other The powerful and the privileged love to justify their status and the status quo by demeaning others not like them by calling them unpatriotic, and in the case of Tiananmen Square it s clear who the real heroes were and who were the scoundrels The lecturer made a point of how important it is to have good leadership at the top and what a difference a judicious decision can make As the lecturer stated, an American ambassador was approached by a Russian ambassador in 1968 and wanted to know what the US would do if they took out the Chinese Nuclear armament sites Wisely President Nixon let it be known in no uncertain terms that would not be tolerated The lecturer makes the point how different history could have been if somebody else had been in charge I don t know maybe if the president in those days had been someone who believed absurd statements such as climate change is a Chinese hoax just maybe the world would have been a whole lot worse than it is today Instead of blaming the Gang of Four for my own ignorance I could have just listened to this highly informative lecture series on China [[ Kindle ]] ↲ The Fall and Rise of China ⇤ The Fall and Rise of China, taught by China expert and Professor Richard Baum of the University of California, Los Angeles, brings to vivid life the human struggles, the titanic political upheavals, and the spectacular speed of China s modern rebirth Offering multilevel insight into one of the most astounding real life dramas of modern history, The Fall and Rise of China weaves together the richly diverse developments and sociopolitical currents that created the China we now see in the headlinesAs we enter what some are already calling the Chinese century, the role of China is deeply fundamental to our reading of the direction of world civilization and history Inpenetrating lectures, The Fall and Rise of China takes you to the heart of the events behind China s new global presence, leaving you with a clear view of both the story itself and its critical implications for our worldCourse Lecture Titles Lectures,minutes per lectureThe Splendor That Was China,Malthus and Manchu Hubris,Barbarians at the Gate,Rural Misery and Rebellion,The Self Strengthening Movement,Hundred Days of Reform and the Boxer UprisingThe End of Empire,The Failed Republic,The Birth of Chinese Communism,Chiang, Mao, and Civil War,The Republican Experiment,Resist JapanChiang s Last Stand,The Chinese People Have Stood UpKorea, Taiwan, and the Cold War,Socialist Transformation,Cracks in the Monolith,The Great Leap Forward,Demise of the Great Leap Forward,Never Forget Class StruggleLong Live Chairman MaoMao s Last Revolution Begins,The Children s Crusade,The Storm Subsides,The Sino Soviet War of Nerves,Nixon, Kissinger, and China,Mao s Deterioration and Death,The Legacy of Mao Zedong An AppraisalThe Post Mao Interregnum,Hua Guofeng and the Four ModernizationsDeng Takes Command,The Historic Third Plenum, The Normalization of US China RelationsDeng Consolidates His Power,Socialist Democracy and the Rule of LawBurying Mao,To Get Rich Is Glorious,The Fault Lines of Reform,The Road to Tiananmen,The Empire Strikes Back, After the Deluge,The Roaring Nineties,The Rise of Chinese Nationalism,China s Lost Territories Taiwan, Hong KongChina in the New Millennium,China s Information RevolutionOne World, One Dream TheOlympicsChina s Rise The Sleeping Giant Stirs Rather than a book, this is a series of 48 1 2 hour lectures you have your choice of audio of video formatI m cheap so I went audioafter waiting for a sale a couponcheck out TGC.com It is not cheap, but it was worth it in my case We re planning a China trip, so I was motivated to learn a bit about the recent history of the country and perhaps appreciate the surroundings of the cities and countrysideseasily.Dr Baum, the lecturer, had studied China forthan 4 decades, t Rather than a book, this is a series of 48 1 2 hour lectures you have your choice of audio of video formatI m cheap so I went audioafter waiting for a sale a couponcheck out TGC.com It is not cheap, but it was worth it in my case We re planning a China trip, so I was motivated to learn a bit about the recent history of the country and perhaps appreciate the surroundings of the cities and countrysideseasily.Dr Baum, the lecturer, had studied China forthan 4 decades, teaching at UCLA for much of that time he recently passed away and lectured for TGC with a passion and love for the Chinese people laobaixing that encouraged me to finish this series in less than a month kind of like finishing a semester of a college course in a month The first 7 lectures covered very briefly pre Mao Chinese historyLight Yes But enough to get the parts dealing with the Opium Wars and Boxer Rebellion and the appalling behavior of the Western imperialistsgiving the Chinese people reason to be pissed off and I m not taking sideslike Dr Baum did Then came the Japanese and their imperialist efforts, ultimately leading to WWII The rest of the lectures carefully traced the transition from the dynastic to the republic of China from Sun Yat sen to Chiang K ai shek Mao, through the bitter civil war and onto the brutal communist regime The narrative follows the course of Mao s early experiments with social and economic systems, following Stalin s blueprintyielding dismal results and heightened civil unrest What struck me most,for example, was the collective farm movement I couldn t help thinking about the US s current efforts to expand collective bargaining with Federal Unions that proved to dis incentivetivize the collective workforce and lead to starvation and death throughout the country.Dr Baum s detractors claim that he s too easy on the despotic, down right monstrous, methods and actions of Mao Zedung during his periodic purges and social experimentsI tend to agree, but fully understand that Baum s point may bedirected toward the Chinese population aka victims and tries apositive outlook for the future of China and her relations with the rest of the worldespecially the US We should look at the Chinese people asthan just the Chi coms , but as people trying to make a better life for themselves apart from their government s mechanisms.I enjoyed the lectures, even though it took an effort to persist through some tough spots Many kudos to Dr Baum.if only I could have had him along on our trip to translate This book has put together many events, which when I learned long time ago in school, I wasn t able to put the causal links and innate connections in acomprehensive way For example, the book presented the real figure of the bi lateral trade between China and Britain in those years before the Opium War and made the cause of the war really clear Somehow I wish that the author could go intodetails withelaborations on events and anecdotes, but that is too much to wish for in a ge This book has put together many events, which when I learned long time ago in school, I wasn t able to put the causal links and innate connections in acomprehensive way For example, the book presented the real figure of the bi lateral trade between China and Britain in those years before the Opium War and made the cause of the war really clear Somehow I wish that the author could go intodetails withelaborations on events and anecdotes, but that is too much to wish for in a general introduction course.In later chapters, the author presenteddetailed descriptions of events from 1970 onward Since he himself was present in China often, he provided many personal stories Somehow I feel that the author deliberately stays on the surface of events, refusing to go into analysis or insightful reflections, probably because this course is at the level of undergraduate introduction.In the last chapter, technology is identified as a liberation force which will bring freedom and democracy I agree to a certain point This book is obviously written eight to ten years ago and the the damage of the technology to democracy is not conspicuous as it is demonstrated now Fake opinions coming from fake companies established by shady establishment, the issues with Facebook data, online censorship from various governments Technology helps democracy as much as it helps anti democracy measures The battle for freedom continues, just on different battle grounds I freely admit listening to most of these twice or even three times this past month as I lectured on Chinese history Not only is Baum an excellent and engaging lecturer, a true role model, he goes all the way to the 2008 Olympics and beyond, pushing forward the interpretation of contemporary Chinese history as a burgeoning superpower still obsessed with overturning those unequal treaties that put it in such a difficult spot during the 19th century, and returning to an idealized version of the I freely admit listening to most of these twice or even three times this past month as I lectured on Chinese history Not only is Baum an excellent and engaging lecturer, a true role model, he goes all the way to the 2008 Olympics and beyond, pushing forward the interpretation of contemporary Chinese history as a burgeoning superpower still obsessed with overturning those unequal treaties that put it in such a difficult spot during the 19th century, and returning to an idealized version of the flourishing age of the 18th century It is a pity Baum passed away in 2012, leaving me to wonder aloud in class what he would say about the newest chapter of Chinese history Certainly the mixture of despair and hope he mentions feeling near the end, in 2010, would not have been resolved Baum s expertise reaches its maximum when we tackle the causes of the Cultural Revolution, particularly the deepening conflict between Mao Zedong on the one hand, Liu Shaoqi, Deng Xiaoping, and other experts on the other, during the years after the Great Leap Forward Baum s story about finding, in a Taiwanese library in the 1970s, documents showing how Liu s twisting of the Mao s educational program after 1962 made Mao furious, is a classic anecdote on the motivation and real practice of doing Chinese history All of his lectures on the 1970s through 2010 are sprinkled with personal anecdotes that add great depth and color to his account, again inspiring today s less experienced lecturer Baum s expertise drops off considerably in his approaches the 19th century I was going to relate his anecdote about Qishan, the Manchu viceroy who took over Lin Zexu s post, and I had included the note that Qishan spent the rest of his life in exile after signing the Chuanbi Convention but it s not exactly true Qishan was called back to court and served in several important posts afterward This is not to castigate Baum in the least, but as a reminder that we must all be modest when we teach these big survey classes, as the most we can do is present the major turning points of history and one or two illustrative stories and biographical portraits, or perhaps some useful data for quantitative analysis Nobody knows it all Good insights into and overview of China s modern history The professor is self focused as many are in my experience , calling attention to his own excursions and endeavours These digressions may be pertinent, but can also leave the listener with a feeling of the instructor s biases.Produced in 2013, so a little dated in its forward looking optimism, the latest iteration of the CCP has become farhostile to freedom. A very good overview of the history of China from Mao to 1990 The lecturer is articulate, well spoken and passionate about the subject Definitely worth the 48 hr time commitment The lectures are the best way to understand modern China The professor builds the image of an inward looking China, which lost its way before the second world war only to regain its rightful position in the world order now It s clear to me that the Chinese deserve their place among the top nations of the world I think they should be given this right because they are very different from the militant Japanese cousins Chinese have really taken to Confucius, they are only really concerned with t The lectures are the best way to understand modern China The professor builds the image of an inward looking China, which lost its way before the second world war only to regain its rightful position in the world order now It s clear to me that the Chinese deserve their place among the top nations of the world I think they should be given this right because they are very different from the militant Japanese cousins Chinese have really taken to Confucius, they are only really concerned with the integrity of their own land and not really interested in any sort of colonization as demonstrated by their history The lecture series works on almost all the counts perfectly the topic is extremely important and relatively uncovered The views are largely unbiased even if one disagrees with many of the conclusions The style is completely engaging with the professor mixing the landmark historical events with personal anecdotes or interesting normal life incidents to create a sense of a grand, purposeful story rumbling towards a rousing climax And most importantly, the details are rich, illuminating and sti The lecture series works on almost all the counts perfectly the topic is extremely important and relatively uncovered The views are largely unbiased even if one disagrees with many of the conclusions The style is completely engaging with the professor mixing the landmark historical events with personal anecdotes or interesting normal life incidents to create a sense of a grand, purposeful story rumbling towards a rousing climax And most importantly, the details are rich, illuminating and still undaunting and easy to understand.To start with, the book starts exactly at a point that is so logical but rarely utilized The relevancy enhanced by skipping the millennia of empires, scholars and apparently exotic lifestyle comes in handy throughout the book Professor Baum present this history as that of another human society in all its achievements, ambitions, injustices and mistakes All the larger than life, history shaping politicians are shown as real life, real time humans ambitious, at times idealistic, at times narcissistic, vain, insecure, ill informed and taking decisions without remotely being aware of the implications The last point on the implications is particularly important as it is often lost to many of us later day observers that there is little inevitability or even significance when most events that are later seen as monumental begin Professor Baum somehow finds enough time to describe tens of otherwise lesser known Chinese politicians who shaped the world historythan hundreds popularly known to the readers of contemporary western history.The decription of the events is breath taking, eventhan the sheer scope From the opium wars to the last days of the royalty, the Taiping and Boxer rebellions, the rise of the nationalists, the ins and the outs of Sun Yat Sen, the common origins and the crazy split of Kuomintang and the Communists, the rise from obscurity of Mao and the fall to the obscurity in the Chinese context at least of Chiang Kai Shek, the Japanese invasion and implications, the Korean war, the Cultural revolution, the Great Leap, the purges of many politicians, the gang of four, the mostly uncertain and at least then appearing unspectacular rise and era of Deng etc etc There is so much to learn from this series that somehow is not just relevant but enormously interesting A very good series of lectures The complex, multi faceted nature of Mao s personality and leadership I found especially fascinating and well done The presenter often has a surprising up close and personal platform to observe many of China s recent events There are probably few China watchers with such a position The personal impressions and anecdotes were appreciated, as well as the smooth spoken delivery of those often hard to remember Chinese names Somehow he managed to render them intell A very good series of lectures The complex, multi faceted nature of Mao s personality and leadership I found especially fascinating and well done The presenter often has a surprising up close and personal platform to observe many of China s recent events There are probably few China watchers with such a position The personal impressions and anecdotes were appreciated, as well as the smooth spoken delivery of those often hard to remember Chinese names Somehow he managed to render them intelligible to my English ears