@Free Ebook ⛎ The Rise and Fall of the British Empire ⚢ eBook or E-pub free

Running at about eighteen hours, Professor Allitt s lecture series on the Rise and Fall of the British Empire was always going to have issues of scope Given the duration of the British Empire, its geographic sprawl and the distinctly different approaches to administration taken in different times and parts of the Empire, this course could only ever be a very broad overview of the Empire s development and the forces that led it to break apart in the mid Twentieth Century.Allitt states in his ver Running at about eighteen hours, Professor Allitt s lecture series on the Rise and Fall of the British Empire was always going to have issues of scope Given the duration of the British Empire, its geographic sprawl and the distinctly different approaches to administration taken in different times and parts of the Empire, this course could only ever be a very broad overview of the Empire s development and the forces that led it to break apart in the mid Twentieth Century.Allitt states in his very first lecture that he will try to avoid discussing the morality of the Empire and focus on describing the historical events and major factors in its development and subsequent fall He does this with varying degrees of success structurally he does do a good job of keeping his focus on exploring the historical events, reserving most of his discussion of the implications of the British Empire until the final lecture The overall structure of the lectures makes a good deal of sense and I was pleasantly surprised by the inclusion of some installments that discussed the cultural reaction to the Empire in terms of colonial and postcolonial themes in literature I was less convinced by the inclusion of a lengthy discussion of cricket and the role it played within the Empire, though that may speak to my own decided lack of enthusiasm about the game Allitt s enthusiasm for the topic however is quite delightful and infectious.Allitt is a very engaging speaker in general and I never struggled to focus on the material when listening, even for long stretches at a time He communicates very clearly and likes to drop in passages from books, letters and memoirs to illustrate his points or to characterize a perspective.With regards issues of possible bias, I felt it was clear that he was trying to be even handed in his presentation of the material though his reliance on quoting sources from British voices rather than from the populations that were conquered means that pro Empire voices come over a littlestrongly in his discussion Those who come to this series with a strong set of convictions about the events discussed are bound to feel at least a little frustrated with elements of the presentation While I would have appreciated some attempt to discuss different perspectives on the Empire, I do think the lecture series would have needed to be even longer to accommodate that.Unfortunately length is really this set s undoing The topic is just too broad to really satisfy in its own right and will leave those who already know aspects of the material feeling there wasn t enough there while those who are new to the topic and enjoy it will inevitably then have to find another book or lecture series on an aspect of it to explore indepth Had this been a 48, rather than 36, lecture set then I think this would have been a very different experience First British people are terrible.Then White people are terrible.Overall Yeah, there s a lot alotof flat out racism but they did some good stuff too uncomfortable sideways glances guilty foot shuffling Remember Dickens Just you know don t look at that stuff he said about Indians um fucking racism, I told you Later past the scope of this course Brexit Yay.note on the narration Allitt does a fantastic job as a lecturer He neither sounds like he s reading off no First British people are terrible.Then White people are terrible.Overall Yeah, there s a lot alotof flat out racism but they did some good stuff too uncomfortable sideways glances guilty foot shuffling Remember Dickens Just you know don t look at that stuff he said about Indians um fucking racism, I told you Later past the scope of this course Brexit Yay.note on the narration Allitt does a fantastic job as a lecturer He neither sounds like he s reading off note cards nor does he over orate like Seth goddamned Lehrer He s right in that comfy middle ground of talking to you like a normal person heart @Free Ebook ¿ The Rise and Fall of the British Empire õ Audio CDs in three cases parts and, accompanied by a like new course bookletlectures in allminutes per lectureaudio CDs Taught by Professor Patrick N Allitt of Emory UniversityAt its peak in the early th century, Britain s empire was the largest in the history of the world, greater even than that of ancient Rome It embraced than a fourth of the world s population and affected the course of Western civilization in ways almost too numerous to imagine Sounds like the kind of book to put you to sleep at the beginning of a semester class you re forced to take right If you have any interest at all in history, you will really like this book It s a series of lectures, organized by topic, by a professor at Emory who does a really good job of making each topic engaging, interesting and relevant to what s happening today Historians are divided on whether the British Empire was positive or negative in the world this book takes a decidedly neutral Sounds like the kind of book to put you to sleep at the beginning of a semester class you re forced to take right If you have any interest at all in history, you will really like this book It s a series of lectures, organized by topic, by a professor at Emory who does a really good job of making each topic engaging, interesting and relevant to what s happening today Historians are divided on whether the British Empire was positive or negative in the world this book takes a decidedly neutral view and lays out the facts Was it right to occupy territory What if those people practiced sati or the burning of widows The issues are complex, and there are no pat, trite answers you can tweet out to your ideologically similar brethren for points Highly recommended for anyone who likes world history and how it affects current events Merged review Really well told stories and topics The history and economics were the substance, but the organization and telling of the stories kept me engaged throughout Fascinating to see how the British Empire shaped the world we live in today I had no idea of the extent I liked this lecture series, especially as the British Empire is not really taught in British schools one rather gets the sense it was something we happened to pick up by accident sometime in the 19th century This itself is one of the historical assessments which Patrik Allitt challenges, but the lecture course itself isfocused on telling you what happened than by coming up with large theories about why it happened or if someone was at fault This is a useful approach for an introductor I liked this lecture series, especially as the British Empire is not really taught in British schools one rather gets the sense it was something we happened to pick up by accident sometime in the 19th century This itself is one of the historical assessments which Patrik Allitt challenges, but the lecture course itself isfocused on telling you what happened than by coming up with large theories about why it happened or if someone was at fault This is a useful approach for an introductory text, although it can feel a little unstuck when Professor Allitt moves from the general narrative to give a reflection based on his own British upbringing and identity, because it makes the areas of greatest British shame such as the Opium Wars, or the repression of the Indian rebellions feel slightly ignored by comparison But I suppose that one has to pick an approach and stick with it, and stopping at every point of the detail of what happened to consider the moral turpitude of Empire would slow down the whole series I can t help but feel a bitof a review at the end to address some of these scholarly debates would have been useful though That aside, the scope of the lectures is compelling, covering the whole of the Empire on whom the sun never set, and covering from Tudor times right up until the Coalition Government of 2010 And the literature review of books coming out of Empire at the end is fantastic, and has already added some books onto the want to read bit of this very app Would definitely recommend Loved this lecture series As an anglophile, there are so many things about Great Britain that I m curious about While not an exhaustive account, it does provide a solid overview of centuries of history that has affected the entire world, not just that fascinating island on the other side of the Atlantic. A very interesting course about the rise and fall of the British Empire It never really lagged and Professor Allitt presents the material in an interesting, accessible way He comes across as somewhat conservative and as something of a colonialist in his sympathies, but everything in the course is presented in a very balanced way.This course was completed back in 2008 and that s a pity because it sure would have been interesting to get Allitt s thoughts on the recent trials of the former empire A very interesting course about the rise and fall of the British Empire It never really lagged and Professor Allitt presents the material in an interesting, accessible way He comes across as somewhat conservative and as something of a colonialist in his sympathies, but everything in the course is presented in a very balanced way.This course was completed back in 2008 and that s a pity because it sure would have been interesting to get Allitt s thoughts on the recent trials of the former empire, particularly Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn s takeover of the Labour party Perhaps a new, broader course on the history of Britain is due There are moments in the course when I was chuckling at things Allitt said such as his mention of a fringe movement calling for British independence from the E.U or his prediction that Britain would eventually join the Eurozone Thankfully, Professor Allitt is a much better historian than he is a prognosticator, and as such this course can still be heartily recommended An amazing account of the of the British empire starting with Elizabeth I. The instructor had a massive topic to cover as he followed threads of the British Empire for four centuries Given this, he did an exceptional job choosing individual topics that turned the diamond he wanted to examine in order to allow specific facets to be put under focus He would take a lecture on Australia and provide interesting insights particular to that part of the empire and its history, but he would also carefully tie that area of the Empire into the issues that were impacting the res The instructor had a massive topic to cover as he followed threads of the British Empire for four centuries Given this, he did an exceptional job choosing individual topics that turned the diamond he wanted to examine in order to allow specific facets to be put under focus He would take a lecture on Australia and provide interesting insights particular to that part of the empire and its history, but he would also carefully tie that area of the Empire into the issues that were impacting the rest of it He was clearly fascinated with all aspects of his subject, and this kind of enthusiasm is contagious to those who might be marginally interested in some aspect of a particular topic.As a Briton who has spent a great deal of time in higher education in the United States, he seemed uniquely qualified to bring the history of the British Empire to a wider, and largely American, audience He took a risk, I thought, in attempting to explain an aspect of that history that greatly puzzles Americans, the defeat of Winston Churchill shortly after World War II, by choosing a personal example Instead of sticking to general trends or sociological nuggets, he explained how his father s military service and its wider exposure led him to vote against the old guard Churchill represented and for the New World represented Churchill s opponent Conversely, he also does an excellent job choosingacademic examples to make his points He has a nose for quotes, whether from academics or participants, that makes his point in an engaging way I know it s trite, but Allitt really does make history come alive Rather than just a list of names, places and dates, he incorporates British society and culture.